The Cradle of the Snake

Cover art for The Cradle of the Snake.

The Cradle of the Snake – a third Mara story.

Each of the three Doctors who piloted the Tardis during the 80s had adventures with longstanding foes like the Daleks and Cybermen, but each of them also had era-specific enemies or monsters that had the potential for further use, but which never made it across into another Doctor’s time. The Sixth Doctor had Sil, the particularly unpleasant slug-like Mentor. The Seventh Doctor tangled with Fenric, the Elder God. The Fifth Doctor’s private property was, if we’re honest, a cut above both of them. The Mara was based in religious symbolism – in Buddhism, Mara is a demon of seduction. Marrying that idea to the Judaeo-Christian idea of a serpent who tempted Eve in the Garden of Eden, Doctor Who’s Mara is all things to all people – a creature of the mind, that feeds your desires and grows stronger, until, when released, it takes the form of a giant snake and is free to obey its own whims, bring chaos and destruction everywhere it sinks its fangs.

Tony listened to the whisper of the Mara in The Cradle of the Snake.

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Earthshock

A classic scene from Earthshock.

Earthshock was a superb, surprising, confusing story.

In 1982, John Nathan-Turner pulled off a secretive double – keeping not only the return of the Cybermen to Doctor Who quiet, but also concealing the shocking death of a companion in the same story.

Tony remembers a story that helped redefine 80s Who – Earthshock.

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The Awakening

Cover art from The Awaening DVD.

The Awakening – an unexpectedly great Fifth Doctor story.

The Awakening is, no matter which way you slice it, an odd Fifth Doctor story. It’s not exactly a time-bending story but it does have what we can imagine are members of a village parish council riding around on horses, dressed as roundheads and cavaliers, and it does also have people from the actual Civil War in the same story. It’s a two-parter that takes place over a single frenetic day, and it has one of the most genuinely creepy aliens seen during Peter Davison’s time as the Doctor – which is no mean feat for a monster that says nothing, and moves really very little.

Tony remembers a great Fifth Doctor story – The Awakening.

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Companion Piece: Erimem

Erimem, from the cover of the Bride of Peladon.

Erimem – a lesser-known companion.

When the Eleventh Doctor decided to go and investigate a spaceship on a collision course with Earth, that just happened to be full of dinosaurs, one of his ‘gang’ was the famous Egyptian Queen Nefertiti. One of the things she was most famous for was disappearing from the records, when clearly she was whisked away in the Tardis to ultimately make a life with a man around whom she could, when all was said and done, probably run rings.

So old news, Nefi!

Tony pays tribute to audio companion of the Fifth Doctor, the Pharaoh Erimem.

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The Whispering Forest

Cover art from The Whispering Forest.

The Whispering Forest – a weird one.

Doctor Who has a grand tradition of stories where ordinary procedures invented by civilized people degenerate over time into blind obedience, ritual and tribalism – The Face of Evil is probably the best and best known such story, though State of Decay too trod the path with a degree of success.

The Whispering Forest is another bold entry in the same vein, but it’s also a kind of scientific-mythological fairy tale, and a battle for what constitutes the truth to boot.

Tony strays into The Whispering Forest and holds tight.

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The Lady of Mercia

The cover of The Lady of Mercia.

The cover of The Lady of Mercia.

‘Turlough was just helping me realign the thermocouples.’

‘I’ll bet he was.’

Ah, they don’t write them like that anymore.

Oh wait – actually, they do. What we mean is, they never used to write them like that in the old days. The cheeky double entrendre would never have got past the BBC censor or Mary Whitehouse’s disapproving eyebrows in the 80s. So from the outset, The Lady of Mercia is very much 80s Who, but it’s written with a modernity and a reality of human relationships of which the likes of Amy Pond and Clara Oswald would thoroughly approve. While the double entendre is an unfair representation of the story as a whole, there’s an emotional depth to the storytelling here that feels very New Who, while the setting and the characters are pure 1983.

 

Tony reviewed The Lady of Mercia from Big Finish. Author Paul Magrs was kind enough to say ‘You write very well’ in return. Delightful man.

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Fortitude, Episode Eleven

A scene from Fortitude, Episode 11.

Fortitude, Episode 11. A great big hole in the ground.

We live in a flawed and imperfect universe.  There are probably theorems to prove this conclusively, whereas Fyler’s Theorem of Fortitude, Episode Eleven only suggests as much with a strong degree of likelihood. In anything but a flawed and imperfect universe, it would be impossible to write and screen a massively expensive, hugely drawn-out frozen miserablist drama series in which characters played by Christopher Eccleston, Michael Gambon and Stanley Tucci die, while the character played by Jessica Raine survives right to the end. Right to the end and beyond, no less, as the astonishing news reaches us that oh yes, Fortitude will be back for a second series.

Tony finally gets to the end of Fortitude, Season 1. There will apparently be more. No-one understands.

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The Twelfth Doctor #7

The Twelfth Doctor #7

The Twelfth Doctor #7 – The Fractures advance.

The first part of The Fractures, told in issue #6 of Titan Comics’ Twelfth Doctor adventures, stuck very closely to modern, contemporary Who – Coal Hill pupil in the Tardis, Kate Lethbridge-Stewart and UNIT at the Tower, wandering time traveler in an orange space suit and so on. Part 2, if anything, feels like we’ve gone back a few years, touching bases along the New Who timeline, all the way back to the first new series in 2005, as we learn what the Fractures are, and why they’re messing with the lives of ordinary Londoners.

Tony reviewed The Twelfth Doctor #7 from Titan Comics.

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The Tenth Doctor #9

The Tenth Doctor #9

The Tenth Doctor #9 – amazing story, great artwork.

The Weeping Angels of Mons has been, from its earliest panels, haunting, spooky, and heartbreaking by turns. Writer Robbie Morrison has delivered a Tenth Doctor story of real nuance and heart, a love letter to the ordinary men who found themselves, voluntarily or not, changing their day to day world for a hell of muck, bullets, wire, fear, noise, gas and all the horrors the human race had by 1914 devised.

In that environment, the Weeping Angels work superbly, terrifyingly well – arguably better, in fact, than in any of their TV adventures so far.

Tony reviewed The Tenth Doctor #9 from Titan Comics.

Read the piece here.

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Tegan Jovanka

Tegan Jovanka.

‘I’m just a mouth on legs’ – but so much more. Tegan Jovanka.

‘Well, that settles it – she’s got to come with us!’

As ‘Welcome to the Tardis’ parties go, it’s not the most promising beginning, and yet Tegan Jovanka is the go-to companion of the Peter Davison era, the one your mind immediately conjures up when you picture the early 80s Tardis. Of the Fifth Doctor’s companions, she’s the one who stays the longest, and the one who lets him get away with least in the way of prevarication, fecklessness or shoddy piloting. In essence, Tegan is the Fifth Doctor’s whetstone – with his personality so much less inherently bluff and commanding than that of his fourth incarnation, it’s Tegan who frequently makes the Fifth Doctor buck his ideas up, or at least gives him an ideal to live up to.

Tony paid tribute to a great 80s companion – Tegan Jovanka.

Read the piece here.

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